Naale_faq-01
Got a question about Naale? We’ve got your answers right here! Here are some of the most frequently asked questions we’ve gotten over the years.

If your question wasn’t addressed here,

contact us and we’ll get back to you with a response!​

Education

Naale students complete the Israeli matriculation (Bagrut) exams and earn an internationally-recognized diploma.

Students in Israel study math on one of three levels.

Three points math is considered basic high school mathematics, and is the level of most Israeli students.

Four points, or intermediate math, teaches college or AP-level mathematics.

Five points math is the most advanced, and is equivalent to university level mathematics.

Students who are highly motivated and have a strong aptitude for math generally attempt four or five points of math. They should be prepared to dedicate significant time and effort both in and beyond the classroom to the subject.

All Naale students complete the Israeli matriculation, or Bagrut exams to earn their internationally-recognized diploma. Typically, Israeli students do not take the SATs or ACTs, and instead take the Israeli Psychometric Exam after graduating.

Naale students who wish to take the SAT or ACT exams may do so during school vacations.

The balance of Hebrew and English instruction varies among schools. Acquiring Hebrew is a goal at Naale, and each school and teacher strives to help students learn the language gradually.

Generally, during the first semester, teachers use basic Hebrew and may explain course material in English. Afterward, most classes are taught in basic Hebrew. By the end of their first year, most students have acquired a strong foundation in reading, writing, and conversational Hebrew.

After the first year, instruction and testing typically take place in Hebrew.

Naale Living

Naale students hail from 65 different countries. Each school has its own policy regarding inter-school activities. Student seminars and trips take place during Pesach, Sukkot, and Chanukah, and an annual “Yom Naale,” or Naale Day brings together all Naale students.

Yes. Naale students reside in the dormitory during the school week, and may visit family and friends on free weekends. Any weekend or holiday excursions off campus must be approved by a student’s parents and by the school staff ahead of time.
In some cases, yes. Some schools require all students (both international and Israeli) to live in the dorms, while some schools give Israeli students the option of dorming or commuting daily.
Naale schools have dorm counselors, a dorm mother, and a Naale coordinator. Together, the dorm staff ensures student safety and security after school hours, enforcing rules and regulations and assisting students as needed.
Yes. All Naale schools are equipped with sports facilities which vary from school to school. For more information, please contact the school’s Naale coordinator.
Yes. Volunteer host families in surrounding communities are paired with Naale students who don’t have relatives in Israel. These families are an additional resource of support for students. We focus on matching students with host families that will be a good fit, so it can take some time until a host family is provided. Contact your Naale coordinator with any questions about the host family program.
Each school has its own policy regarding students leaving campus. Some schools allow students to leave campus in groups, and others may allow students to leave with a staff member. For more information, please speak with the school’s Naale coordinator.
Naale is a program co-funded by the State of Israel and the Jewish Agency for Israel. Naale is affiliated with over 25 high schools throughout Israel. Each school caters to a different demographic based on religious preference and common language.
In most cases, parents should first approach the Naale Coordinator at their child’s school. The Naale Regional Manager is also a good initial resource who can provide further guidance. Issues that are school-specific or confidential are handled discreetly between parents, students, and school faculty.
Drinking, smoking, reckless or dangerous behavior, causing harm to a fellow student, disregarding school rules and regulations, and neglecting studies would all serve as grounds for dismissal from the program.
No. Naale students who are not Israeli citizens enter Israel on an extended tourist visa. Naale students who are Israeli citizens arrive with a valid Israeli passport and need not make Aliyah. Upon graduation, students who choose to make Aliyah are entitled to receive benefits from the Ministry of Aliyah and Absorption.
Yes. Provided that they have spent at least 4 years abroad prior to applying, children of Israeli citizens and children born in Israel may apply to Naale. Please speak to your Regional Manager to find out whether additional requirements or restrictions apply.

According to Israeli law, students who meet the following criteria are required to draft into the army upon completing the 12th grade:

Students who have at least one Israeli parent.

Students who have spent at least two years of high school in Israel, provided they are Israeli citizens. Students who are not Israeli citizens are not required to serve in the IDF upon graduation.

Students who will be enlisting in the IDF meet with their Naale coordinator and the alumni department in 12th grade to discuss their options. The “tzav rishon” or initial draft notice, is generally attended as a group by Naale students for whom it is relevant.

Yes, students can stay in the program as long as they start Naale at least three months before their parents make Aliyah. In order to remain eligible for Naale benefits, students must continue living in the dorms and adhering to the school weekend schedule. In such a case, students may certainly go home for free weekends. If parents plan to make Aliyah while their child is a Naale student, it is best to discuss this ahead of time with the Regional Manager and Aliyah coordinator, as the student’s Aliyah benefits might be affected.
Israeli students may be eligible to join a Naale class through Aliyat Hanoar. Please be in touch directly with the Naale school you are interested in for more information about this option.
Covid regulations permitting, we love it when families visit the campuses. Please be in touch directly with schools to arrange your visit ahead of time. And check out our Instagram and Facebook live sessions with our schools to find out more! (link)
Yes. Be aware that each school has its own policy regarding how much school students can miss for family events and visits. We encourage parents to schedule visits during or adjacent to school vacations to minimize school absences.

Naale works with both religious and secular schools. The secular schools are co-ed and the religious schools are separate for boys and girls.

Yes. In order to to recieve the full benefits of the program students must live on campus. If you are interested in joining a Naale class as an external student please be in touch directly with the Naale school you are interested in for more information.

For prospective Naale students whose families have already made aliyah, please note: Israeli students may be eligible to partake in a Naale class through the Aliyat Hanoar program. Please be in touch directly with the Naale school you are interested in for more information about this option. 

Naale students have to be between the ages of 13-16 when they start the program. But you can begin the registration process right away and we’ll be in touch when registration begins!

Covid

Each school has a clear policy in place for handling masks and other supplies. Schools typically provide one or two reusable masks, and students should bring additional reusable masks. To find out the current guidelines, contact your Naale coordinator.

Financial

The program itself is free! Signing up does involve two fees:

A one-time $600 application fee

A one-time $600 acceptance fee

Other than these two payments, there are no additional costs.

The program includes airfare to Israel at the beginning of the program, room and board, off-campus travel expenses, tiyulim (trips), spending money, and more, and is fully funded by the Israeli government and the Jewish Agency for Israel.

Each school has a clear policy in place for handling masks and other supplies. Schools typically provide one or two reusable masks, and students should bring additional reusable masks. To find out the current guidelines, contact your Naale coordinator.
Motivated, mature teens aged 13-16 who are eligible for Israel’s Law of Return.
Naale is a three- or four-year program, depending on whether a student starts in 9th or 10th grade.
Naale is a voluntary program. Students are expected to remain in the program for the full three or four years, but we do not stand in the way of a student who decides to return home after a year or two. About Naale The program spans 3-4 years and is structured accordingly. About Naale It can take time to adjust to high school in Israel. We encourage students to participate in the Naale program for its full duration to allow for a rewarding and maturing experience.
Yes. Most Naale schools have a 9th grade class. At our screening sessions, we seek to ensure that these younger students are well-suited to attend Naale.
Yes, as long as they are between 13-16 years old when they begin the program, and are willing to repeat 10th grade. Each year, there are a number of 11th grade students who opt to attend Naale by repeating 10th grade. Students entering 11th grade who can read, write, and speak Hebrew at a high enough level to succeed in an Israeli classroom may study at their grade level after passing our advanced Hebrew placement test at the screening.

Education

The balance of Hebrew and English instruction varies among schools. Acquiring Hebrew is a goal at Naale, and each school and teacher strives to help students learn the language gradually.

Generally, during the first semester, teachers use basic Hebrew and may explain course material in English. Afterward, most classes are taught in basic Hebrew. By the end of their first year, most students have acquired a strong foundation in reading, writing, and conversational Hebrew.

After the first year, instruction and testing typically take place in Hebrew.

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